Employers can cut healthcare costs with a Corporate Wellness and Weight Loss Program!

Salvéo is doctor supervised healthy weight loss, co-founded by Dr. Amy Articolo and Dr. Suzanne Mackey to help treat and provide a supportive environment for their patients in their weight loss journey.

Salvéo is doctor supervised healthy weight loss, co-founded by Dr. Amy Articolo and Dr. Suzanne Mackey to help treat and provide a supportive environment for their patients in their weight loss journey. They are passionate about their mission, and their patients. They believe in the value of open and honest communication, creating a warm and welcoming environment. They take the time to listen. They treat obesity as a disease and remove the shame and guilt that some patients may feel.

Salvéo customizes a program for each individual. They realize that each person is unique, and therefore, the treatment plan should be tailored to meet those needs. As one of their patients says,

I am not on a diet; I am on a journey into good health.

  • 97% of patients lose significant weight at their first follow-up.
  • 12 lbs. is the average weight loss for new patients in the first month.
  • 5% average beginning body weight is lost in the 1st month.
  • 75% of patients stay in the maintenance programs.

National Obesity Care Week Kicks Off

More than 35 leading U.S. healthcare organizations have joined together to form National Obesity Care Week (NOCW), an annual campaign to advance a comprehensive, compassionate, and personalized approach to treating obesity as a disease. National Obesity Care Week kicked off yesterday and runs through November 7, with the inaugural event calling upon healthcare professionals, patients, and policymakers to “Change the Way We Care” for obesity for the benefit of those individuals living with obesity.

“No one organization is capable of reaching all the individuals affected by obesity and single-handedly transforming care in America,” said Francesca Dea, CAE, Executive Director of The Obesity Society (TOS). “It takes a collective effort to achieve significant change and we are thrilled with the overwhelming level of support for our inaugural initiative. By working together, our collective voice is stronger and we can achieve great things.”

Led by founding partners (all American Board of Obesity Medicine partner organizations), The Obesity Society (TOS), the Obesity Action Coalition (OAC), Strategies to Overcome and Prevent (STOP) Obesity Alliance and the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), National Obesity Care Week coincides with ObesityWeek 2015.

Specifically, the campaign focuses on improving healthcare professionals’ understanding of obesity as a disease and knowledge of the full spectrum of evidence-based medical strategies.

National Obesity Care Week is employing a multi-tiered approach, including broad public awareness, healthcare professional education and influencer engagement.

“The ABOM community of physicians is already at the forefront of changing the way healthcare professionals treat obesity,” said ABOM Executive Director Dana Brittan. “As an organization, we are excited to see so many ABOM partner organizations turn their attention to raising awareness about the positive impact healthcare professionals can make in this important effort.”

Obesity medicine specialists can support the campaign in several ways:

Learn more about National Obesity Care Week
Share information about National Obesity Care Week
Sign the Treat Obesity Seriously pledge


From: abom.org/national-obesity-care-week-kicks-off/

Food As Medicine

There was well over 4.5 trillion prescriptions filled in the United States alone in 2014, an increase from 3.9 billion in 2010 according to the IMS Health Institute.

There was well over 4.5 trillion prescriptions filled in the United States alone in 2014, an increase from 3.9 billion in 2010 according to the IMS Health Institute.

A second mass study done in 2010 by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) showed that as children aged, their fruit and vegetable intake decreased from 92 percent down to 66 percent.

These two studies may show a direct relationship between the overall health decline in United States citizens (based on an increase of prescriptions filled) and the steady decrease in the intake of healthy foods like vegetables. Those who practice western medicine often end up leaving the fate of a recent diagnosis (and more importantly the recovery methods to said prognosis) up to a trusted doctor or sometimes a family member.

Regardless of the success and progress made within western medicine, there is often more than one way to take proactive action, especially in regards to health. If an individual recently experienced a decline in their health, whether in the form of an acute injury, a relentless cold or even a diagnosis of a chronic disease, it would be reasonable to assume that the individual would elect to combat the issue using as many responsible methods available in order to reclaim their health.

Despite the quick results of prescription drugs, the most safe and holistic method of healthy recovery and prevention is your diet. Food has long been used as medicine in many cultures across the world. Given the fact that food ingested into the body literally becomes the structure of our tissues, food is the very foundation of our longevity and long-term health. Food is a powerful force that may also influence the absorption and utilization of prescription drugs as well as dietary supplements.

Eating a nutrient-dense diet allows your body to recover, repair and prevent adverse health issues while optimizing the use of prescriptions and dietary supplements. For example, common health issues such as asthma, constipation, osteoarthritis and high cholesterol can be combated with the inclusion of particular foods. Research in 2004 and 2007 showed that children with lower levels of vitamin C were more likely to develop respiratory problems and be diagnosed with asthma (Healing Foods, 2008). Eating a variety of foods containing higher amounts of vitamin C can reduce the severity of asthma attacks and limits the release of histamine in the body which causes wheezing and runny nose.

Some foods can also reduce your risk of a multitude of other health problems. For example, beans have been shown to reduce the symptoms of menopause, prevent certain forms of cancer, reduce the risk of heart disease, and even improve your bone and prostate health (Healing Foods, 2008). Peppers are a highly nutritional food that can aid in weight loss, treatment of colds, arthritis pain prevention, protect against cancer and heart disease, and they’re loaded with antioxidants.

As Hippocrates said nearly 3,000 years ago, “let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” Provided for us by the Earth, natural foods contain the vital life energy that we need to maintain optimal health, and to recover from health challenges. Asking a certified nutritionist what foods may optimize your particular health concerns could successfully catapult your recovery and long-term health management.

About the Author:
Working within the health field for four years, Laurel Dierking MEd, NFPT, is passionate about cultivating body, mind and spirit awareness through holistic health practices. As a Health and Fitness Professional and yoga instructor at JKFITNESS, Laurel strives to guide individuals on a path to self-awareness, long-term functional fitness, and weight-loss management.

Disclaimer: This blog post does not reflect the views of the OAC, the National Board of Directors or staff. The OAC does not endorse any merchandise, program or hyperlinks mentioned in this blog post.


From: www.obesityaction.org/food-as-medicine

Food and Disease

Did you know that you can influence your susceptibility to certain diseases with the very next bite of food you take?

Most people know the importance of a well-balanced diet and its role in sustaining our health, energy levels, immunity, and overall functioning of the body, but to what extent does what we eat influence our ability to stay disease-free?

According to research from The Health Sciences Institute, genetic defects only account for about five percent of all human diseases (Antonarakis, Chakravarti, Cohen, Hardy, 2010). Genetics merely determine how susceptible a person is to a particular disease — it is our diet that ultimately influences the expression of our genetic coding. No longer can we entirely blame our health outcomes on our parents and grandparents.

Beginning in utero, the substances that support the development of a baby’s physical body is derived from the nutrients in the foods ingested by the expecting mother. This initial make-up creates the foundation for longevity of every human being. The human body is resilient when it comes to dealing with matter such as processed foods, tobacco, harmful chemicals, artificial sweeteners and other hard-to-digest substances. Over time however, persistent damage to cells and organs through malnutrition can lead to permanent damage of our body tissues.

Histopathology (the study of the connection between body tissue and disease) has yielded tremendously valuable research linking the quality of our bodies tissues to the likelihood of the development of certain diseases. Our bodies are only able to maintain a certain level of homeostasis (the healthy balance of internal conditions within the body) depending on what is provided for fuel and support to ensure the correct functioning of our systems. This is indicative of most chronic diseases developing later in adulthood.

For example, cancer often-times develops when a cell does not die, is unable to properly flush stored waste and becomes toxic or when it is malfunctioning and loses the ability to communicate with other cells. When an unhealthy or mutated cell does not self-destruct, the cells may grow and multiply into what then becomes a lump or tumor. Risk of diseases such as type II diabetes, cancer, heart disease, obesity and stroke can be drastically reduced through a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, protein, complex carbohydrates and healthy fats..

Not only is it critical for you to take ownership of the development and maintenance of your body, but it’s important to realize that you have control over what comprises the structure of your cells — the very cells diligent in restructuring, maintaining function of and sustaining the organs driving your life force.

Through mindfulness and awareness of your diet, you can reduce your susceptibility to chronic diseases and take more control over your long-term health than ever thought before. An active lifestyle coupled with a nutritionally dense diet is two major ways to take charge and influence your longevity. It is never too late to get on track with your health. You can make a difference with your very next bite!

About the Author:
Working within the health field for four years, Laurel Dierking MEd, NFPT, is passionate about cultivating body, mind and spirit awareness through holistic health practices. As a Health and Fitness Professional and yoga instructor at JKFITNESS, Laurel strives to guide individuals on a path to self-awareness, long-term functional fitness, and weight-loss management.

Disclaimer: This blog post does not reflect the views of the OAC, the National Board of Directors or staff. The OAC does not endorse any merchandise, program or hyperlinks mentioned in this blog post.


From: www.obesityaction.org/food-and-disease